Areas of Practice - Criminal Defense continued...

By the time you read this material you, a friend, or a family member may already have entered the federal or state criminal justice system. One thing that is certain about criminal cases is that no two are exactly alike. Therefore, any attempt to provide information about what a person should expect when they are charged in a criminal case is general and does not apply to any particular charge or jurisdiction. While procedures are generally uniform among the federal districts, the rules vary widely between state systems, and occasionally between state courts within the same state. Included below is a short summary of what to expect if you are charged in a federal criminal case, and what to expect if you are charged in a state criminal case.

The only other thing that is certain about criminal cases is that the outcome of the case will often depend on whether a skillful and experienced defense attorney has been retained as early as possible in the case. As a career prosecutor, defense counsel, and judge, Attorney Mike Walther can provide the defense-in-depth you need to assure the most favorable outcome of your situation.

Please explore our website, review our list of Frequently Asked Questions, and contact us for a free consultation regarding the specifics of your case. 

Federal Criminal Case – What to Expect?

Choose from the list below to see a short summary of what will happen to you if you are charged in a federal criminal case. This information is very general and does not apply to any particular criminal charge.


Introduction
Release or Detention
Your Rights
Custody
Arraignment
Probation Office Conference
Speedy Trial
Trial
Guilty Pleas

Cooperation
Other Charges
Sentencing
Voluntary Surrender
Appeal
Probation
Prison
Conclusion


State Criminal Case – What to Expect?

Choose from the list below to see a short summary of what will happen to you if you are charged in a federal criminal case. This information is very general and does not apply to any particular criminal charge.

Introduction
Preliminary Arraignment
Preliminary Hearing
Pre-Trial Conference

Trial
Sentencing
Appeals/Post-Conviction Relief


Federal Case

Introduction

SilenceBy the time you read this material you, a friend, or family member may already have entered the federal criminal justice system. Whether you are in custody or in the “free world,” one firm rule applies: Do not discuss your case with anyone but your lawyer. Anything you say will be used against you. This is true whether you talk to a police officer, a person you just met in a holding cell, or a “friend." Silence means: Do not discuss your cases with inmates or with anyone on the telephone. ALL CONVERSATIONS FROM THE JAIL ARE RECORDED.


Your LawyerIf you cannot afford to hire your own attorney, you will be appointed a lawyer by
Federal law (18 U.S.C. §3006A, The Criminal Justice Act). You will be appointed either a Federal Public Defender or a Criminal Justice Act (“CJA”) Panel Lawyer. Federal Public Defenders work for an organization that only represents federal criminal defendants. CJA Panel lawyers are private lawyers approved to represent federal criminal defendants when requested by the Court. A Magistrate Judge will determine whether you qualify for appointed counsel.

HonestyDefendants often believe it is better not to tell their lawyers the truth about their case. This is not a good idea. Everything you tell your lawyer is privileged and cannot be told to others. The best defense is one that prepares for all the bad evidence the prosecutor may present against you at your trial. Your lawyer must know all the facts. It is foolish to ignore the dangers and simply hope everything will turn out all right. That is the sure way to be convicted.

Bad AdviceIIf you are in custody, you will probably get a lot of free advice from other inmates. Unfortunately, much of that advice will be wrong. Many other inmates are in state custody and know nothing about federal criminal law. Even the ones facing federal charges may give you bad advice either because they do not know any better or because they want to mislead you.


ReleaseThere is no parole in the federal criminal justice system. You will serve most of your sentence, minus Good Time Credit. The Bureau of Prisons often places prisoners in a halfway house when there is 6 months or less on their sentences. You will begin a term of supervised release after you are released from custody. Like probation or parole, supervised release means you have to follow rules and report back to a probation officer. Violating supervised release can mean going back to prison.


RespectTreat your lawyer with respect, and that respect will be returned to you. Lawyers are human beings who tend to work harder for clients who do not mistreat them.


Telephone CallsBe responsible about collect calls to your lawyer. You cannot expect your lawyer to accept continuous collect calls from you. If you have not heard from your lawyer for an unreasonable time, you should call and request a meeting, have a friend or relative call, or write a letter and request a response. RETURN TO topics

Release or Detention The first thing you will probably be concerned about is whether you are going to be released while awaiting trial. There is no bond set automatically in federal court. Your family cannot simply pay a bondsman to get you out.


Court AppearanceIf you were arrested and taken into custody, you will soon appear before a United States Magistrate Judge. This is not the District Judge that will hear your trial. This Magistrate Judge will decide if there are any conditions that would allow your release.


Pretrial Report

To assist the Magistrate Judge, a Pretrial Services Officer will interview you and give the Magistrate Judge a written report about your background and criminal history. The officer will not ask you about the facts of your case. If you lie to the officer, it will hurt you later. If you are not certain about whether to answer a question, ask to speak to an attorney for advice.

Likelihood of ReleaseYou are most likely to be released if you have little or no criminal history, if you have solid employment, if you have family ties in your community, if you are a United States Citizen, and if you are not charged with a drug trafficking offense or crime of violence. Even if you are not a good risk for release, the Magistrate Judge must still hold a hearing and find reasons to keep you in custody. The only time this hearing is unnecessary is when you are being held in custody for other reasons — such as a sentence in another case, a parole warrant, or a probation revocation warrant. RETURN TO topics

Your Rights When people talk about “rights” in the federal criminal justice system, they are usually talking about the fourth, fifth, sixth and eight amendments to the United States Constitution. These rights include freedom from unreasonable searches and seizures, the right to remain silent, due process of law, equal protection under the law, protection from double jeopardy, a speedy and public trial, and the ability to confront one’s accusers, subpoenas for witnesses, reasonable bail, and freedom from cruel and unusual punishment.


Case lawThere are many books and thousands of cases that discuss what these rights mean. The law is always changing. A court opinion written in 1934 by a Montana court of appeals is probably no help in your case. Your case will mostly be affected by recent published opinions of the responsible United States Court of Appeals and the United States Supreme Court.


ApplicationNot all these rights apply in all cases. If you never made a statement to the police, then it will not matter whether you were told of your right to remain silent. If you consented to a search of your car, then it will not make a difference whether the police had a search warrant. RETURN TO topics

Custody There are no benefits to being locked up. Jail has many rules and regulations. Some of those rules are made by the jailers. Some of those rules are made by other inmates.

ClothingDespite what others tell you, your lawyer cannot simply bring you clothing. Trial clothing can be brought to your lawyer’s office shortly before your next court appearance. You will be allowed to change in the holding cell at the federal courthouse.


Other PossessionsMost items need to be purchased through the commissary. You may keep legal documents in your possession.


VisitsYour friends and relatives must follow the jail’s rules when making appointments to visit you. You must put the names of these persons on your visitation list. Some jails require visitors to make appointments at least 24-hours in advance.


Attorney VisitsMost defendants would like to see their lawyer as often as possible. Because of the caseload each attorney has, it is not possible to visit any particular client every time the client calls. This does not mean your lawyer does not care about you or will not properly prepare your case for trial.RETURN TO topics

Arraignment At some point you will come to court for an arraignment. This is the time when you enter a plea of “Not Guilty.”


IndictmentBefore the arraignment you will have been indicted by a grand jury. Neither you, nor your attorney, have a right to be present at the grand jury session. A grand jury decides if there is enough evidence to have a trial in your case. If there is not, then the case is dismissed. If there is probable cause to believe that you committed a felony, the grand jury will issue an indictment. An indictment is the document that states what the charges against you are.


HearingThe arraignment takes place before a Magistrate Judge, not the District Judge who will hear your case. The Magistrate Judge will ask you how you wish to plead to the charges? Your lawyer will answer “Not Guilty.” You cannot plead “Guilty” at an arraignment. Pleading “Not Guilty” will never be used against you. RETURN TO topics

Probation Office Conference In some Federal Districts, criminal defendants must attend a conference with their attorney, the prosecuting attorney and a probation officer. The purpose of the conference is to inform you of your potential sentence if you are convicted either by a trial or guilty plea. Listen to what is said to you, but do not say anything. What you say will be used against you. RETURN TO topics

Speedy Trial Many defendants want a quick trial. This is usually for two reasons. First, defendants who are in custody want to get out of the county jail as soon as possible. Second, defendants believe that if they are not tried within the Speedy Trial Act’s 70-day time limit then their cases will be dismissed.


Pretrial DetentionA defendant is rarely helped by going to trial as soon as possible. The prosecutor is prepared to try the case when it is filed. Your lawyer is only then beginning to investigate the case. Your lawyer does not have access to all of the prosecutor’s files.


DismissalThere are many exceptions to the Speedy Trial Act. The usual reason why a prosecutor requests a continuance is that there are co-defendants that have not yet been arrested. The speedy trial deadlines do not even begin to run until all charged defendants have appeared in court. Also, whenever any of the defendants have filed motions, the time until those motions are decided is not counted toward the speedy trial deadline. Cases are usually tried within the speedy trial deadlines.RETURN TO topics

Trial A felony trial in federal court is decided by twelve jurors. The jurors only decide if you are “Guilty” or “Not Guilty” of the charges in the indictment. Jurors do not get to decide punishment. The District Judge decides punishment.

Jury SelectionThe trial begins with the selection of the jury. A panel of potential jurors is called to court from voter registration and driver’s license lists. The District Judge asks questions of the panel, and the panel also answers written questions. The lawyers are allowed to keep certain members of the panel from sitting on the jury. The first twelve of the remaining panel members become jurors, and the next two panel members become alternate jurors.

Opening StatementsBefore the evidence is presented, the lawyers may make opening statements. During opening statements, the lawyers tell the jury what they believe the evidence will show.

Order of ProofThe prosecutor presents evidence first. You are presumed to be innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. You do not have to present any evidence or testify. If your lawyer does put on evidence, it will happen after the prosecutor has finished presenting the government’s case.

RulesDuring the trial, the lawyers must follow the rules of evidence and procedure. These rules are complicated. The rules can both help and hurt you. For instance, the rule against hearsay evidence may prohibit a prosecutor from calling a witness to testify that he heard about what you did. The same rule can stop your lawyer from introducing an affidavit made by some person who is unwilling to come to court and testify for you.

Prior ActsAlthough you are only on trial for the charges in the indictment, there are two ways the jury can learn about other accusations against you. First, if you testify, then the prosecutor may be able to introduce your prior convictions. Second, the prosecutor can introduce your prior acts — even if they are not convictions— if they are similar to the crime you are charged with (for example, prior drug sales in a drug distribution case).

Final ArgumentsAfter all the evidence has been presented, the lawyers argue the facts to the jury.

Jury DeliberationsJurors are usually average working people from the community. They are not specially trained in law. They use their common sense when deciding the case. Although the District Judge will instruct them about “the presumption of innocence” and “proof beyond a reasonable doubt,” jurors rely on many things in coming to a decision in a case. Jurors often rely on things they are not supposed to, such as: the appearance of the defendant, the defendant’s character, their own biases and prejudices. There is nothing to stop them from doing this, and they cannot be questioned about how they reached their decision.

VerdictIf you are found “Not Guilty,” you will be released. If there is a “Guilty” verdict, then the District Judge will order the Probation Department to prepare a Presentence Investigation Report to assist the District Judge at sentencing. It takes approximately three months between a conviction and sentencing, unless you had an expedited presentence interview [see above].

ReleaseIf you were previously on pretrial release, the District Judge may continue that release until sentencing, unless you were convicted of a crime of violence or a drug trafficking offense. RETURN TO topics

Guilty Pleas Statistics show that most defendants plead guilty. You make the decision to plead guilty. That decision is never simple. Some possible benefits of a guilty plea are that: the prosecutor may dismiss some charges; the prosecutor may not file new charges; the prosecutor may recommend a favorable sentence; you may get credit for accepting responsibility, etc.

Plea AgreementAny promises the prosecutor makes for your guilty plea will be put in a written plea agreement. That agreement is signed by you, your lawyer, and the prosecutor. Some plea agreements require you to waive your right to appeal a sentence, unless it is above the sentencing range determined by the Federal Sentencing Guidelines.

Plea HearingYou must enter a guilty plea in court before the District Judge. The District Judge must ask you many questions so the record shows you understand what you are doing. During the hearing, the prosecutor will briefly tell the District Judge the facts of the case. You must agree to those facts for the District Judge to accept your guilty plea.

Effect of PleaOnce the District Judge accepts your plea, you are just as guilty as if a jury returned that verdict. Once you are convicted of a felony, you lose the right to vote, the right to hold public office, the right to sit on a jury, and the right to possess firearms.

After PleaThe procedure after a guilty plea is the same as after a conviction at trial. A Presentence Investigation Report will be ordered and you will be either released or detained until sentencing [see above]. RETURN TO topics

Cooperation Some defendants give prosecutors information against other persons for the possibility of a reduced sentence. There is no guarantee that a defendant will get a lower sentence for “giving people up.” Cooperation can be dangerous and it usually requires a defendant to set up others or testify in court. RETURN TO topics

Other Charges Often, federal defendants are first arrested by state officers on state charges. Sometimes, even when federal charges are filed, the state charges are not dismissed. It is possible to be convicted of both state and federal charges for the same offense. This is not double jeopardy. It is also possible to get “stacked time” (a consecutive sentence), by pleading guilty to an unrelated state or federal case before getting a conviction in your federal case. Be careful not to do anything about your other cases without telling your attorney.RETURN TO topics

Sentencing Sentencing takes place approximately three months after you have been convicted by a jury or guilty plea, unless you had an expedited presentence interview [see above]. The District Judge decides the sentence. Unlike state court, you cannot simply agree with the prosecutor to serve a particular amount of time or probation.

Federal Sentencing GuidelinesThe District Judge decides your sentence based upon a book called the Federal Sentencing Guidelines Manual. That book works on a point system. You get points for the seriousness of the offense and your role in the offense. Points may be subtracted if you accept responsibility for the offense or if you were only a minor participant. The Manual also considers your criminal history. Your criminal history is the record of your prior convictions in state and federal courts. A chart at the back of the Manual determines your sentencing range, based upon your criminal history points and the points you received for the offense conduct.

Mandatory Minimum PunishmentsSome drug and firearms cases have mandatory minimum punishments. These minimum punishments apply even if the Federal Sentencing Guidelines would otherwise give you a lower sentence.

DeparturesIf the District Judge sentences you to more or less time than your sentencing range, it is called a “departure.” The District Judge must have a good legal reason for a departure. The District Judge cannot depart downward below a mandatory minimum punishment, unless the reason is that you have provided substantial assistance to the government in the prosecution of others.

Presentence Investigation ReportBefore the sentencing hearing, the District Judge will review a Presentence Investigation Report prepared by a probation officer. That report summarizes the offense conduct, your criminal history, and other relevant background information about you. Most important, the report calculates a range of punishment for the District Judge to consider in your case.

The probation officer creates the report based upon information from the prosecutor, independent investigation, and an interview with you in the presence of your lawyer. If you agree in writing, the probation officer can begin the interview before your conviction. This can greatly reduce the time you remain in local custody between conviction and transfer to a federal facility. Discuss this procedure with your lawyer.

InterviewIt is important to be honest with the probation officer at the presentence interview. If you mislead the officer, you may increase your sentence for “obstruction of justice.” Also, you will not get credit for accepting responsibility unless you talk truthfully about your crime. Do not talk about any other conduct for which you have not been convicted, unless your lawyer instructs you to do so.

ObjectionsBefore the District Judge gets the Presentence Investigation Report, it will be sent to your lawyer. Your lawyer will bring it to you for your inspection. If there is anything incorrect about the report, your lawyer can file objections. Some mistakes are more important than others. The fact that the report says your car is red rather than blue is probably not important. On the other hand, if the report says you have five (5) prior felonies when you do not, that is extremely important.

Sentencing HearingAt the sentencing hearing, the District Judge will review your objections to the Presentence Investigation Report and make findings about any facts or legal issues that cannot be agreed upon. Your lawyer will address the legal issues and point out the facts in your favor. District Judges usually do not like to hear from relatives who are just there to plead for a reduced sentence, but their presence is welcome. Letters of recommendation and other helpful evidence should be provided to your lawyer well before sentencing so the District Judge can see them before the hearing. Before the District Judge pronounces the sentence, you can speak. You
should speak only if you are going to say something about being sorry for the crime. It is a bad idea for you to start claiming innocence or making excuses at sentencing. It is better to say nothing.

Concurrent and Consecutive SentencesNo area of law is more confusing to defendants and lawyers than whether multiple sentences (more than one), may be served at the same time (concurrent), or one after another (consecutive).

Present ChargesIf your federal indictment has several related charges, and you are convicted of them, you will probably serve these sentences at the same time. However, it is possible for the District Judge to “stack” convictions so each must be served before another begins.

Other ChargesSometimes a defendant is already serving a sentence before being convicted in a federal court. Usually, the federal sentence will be consecutive.RETURN TO topics

Voluntary Surrender If you were on release until sentencing, you may be allowed voluntary surrender. This means about four to six weeks later you will report directly to the federal prison designated for the sentence. Otherwise, you will go directly into custody after sentencing, if you received a prison sentence.RETURN TO topics

Appeal An appeal is not a new trial. An appeal is a review of your case by the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, which is located in Atlanta, Georgia. You may only appeal after you have been sentenced. Transcripts of all testimony, and all the legal documents in your case, are sent to the Court of Appeals. The Court of Appeals decides whether the District Judge made any mistakes in ruling on the law in your case. If the Court of Appeals decides there was some important mistake made by the District Judge in your case, the usual remedy is that you will be allowed to have a new trial or a new sentencing. That is called a “reversal.” It does not happen often. It is nearly impossible to be released while your appeal is being decided.
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Probation
Probation means your term of imprisonment is suspended. You must follow restrictive conditions and report to a probation officer. Probation is not available for most federal drug trafficking crimes. Except minor fraud cases, most federal defendants do not get probation. “Shock Incarceration” or “Boot Camp” is not probation. That is a military discipline program followed by time in a halfway house. It is available mostly to young, nonviolent, first-time offenders. RETURN TO topics

Prison Most defendants who are sentenced to prison go directly into custody or remain in custody. Where the sentence will be served, depends on several factors.


State CustodyIf the reason you first came into custody was a state charge, a state parole warrant, or state probation revocation warrant, then you are in state custody, not federal custody. Neither the United States Marshal, nor the District Judge, has the authority to take you from state custody so that you may begin serving your sentence in a federal institution. This means you will remain in the county jail or the State Department of Corrections until the jurisdiction to which you owe time is done with you. Even if you got a federal sentence that is to run at the same time as your previous sentences [see above], you will do that time in the other jurisdiction’s prison.


Federal CustodyYou are in federal custody if you were arrested on a federal warrant. It does not matter that you are being held in the county jail or that state charges or revocations are later filed.


DesignationIf you are in federal custody, then a federal institution must be designated for your sentence. This designation takes about four to six weeks and is made by the Federal Bureau of Prisons. During that time you will probably remain in the county jail. The decision about where you will go depends upon the seriousness of the crime, your criminal history and the location of your family, among other things. A recommendation by the District Judge to send you to a particular place is not binding on the Bureau of Prisons.


Good Time CreditThe Bureau of Prisons can give you up to 54 days a year of “Good Time Credit.” This is time subtracted from your sentence. The credit is a privilege for good behavior, not a right. It does not begin to be computed until after your first year in prison or shortly before your release date, whichever is first.RETURN TO topics

Conclusion Remember, every case is different. The above information is only very general advice. There may be special rules that apply to your particular situation. You need to talk about the specific issues in your case with your lawyer. Contact Walther Law P.C. for a free consultation. RETURN TO topics

State Criminal Case – What to Expect?What follows is a short summary of what will happen to you if you are charged in a Pennsylvania State criminal case. This information is very general and does not apply to any particular criminal charge. It is important to get a qualified criminal defense attorney involved as soon as possible after arrest to help protect your rights, as well as to help friends and loved ones navigate the complexities of post-arrest court proceedings and the procedures associated with posting bail.


Introduction - State Case
SilenceBy the time you read this material you, a friend, or family member may already have entered the state criminal justice system. Whether you are in custody or in the “free world,” one firm rule applies: Do not discuss your case with anyone but your lawyer. Anything you say will be used against you. This is true whether you talk to a police officer, a person you just met in a holding cell, or a “friend.” Silence means: Do not discuss your cases with inmates or with anyone on the telephone. ASSUME THAT ALL CONVERSATIONS FROM THE JAIL ARE RECORDED.

Your LawyerIf you cannot afford to hire your own attorney, you may qualify to be represented free of charge by an attorney from the County Public Defender’s Office. The Pennsylvania General Assembly enacted the Public Defender Act in 1968. This act established the office of Public Defender throughout the Commonwealth and specified the duties of the office. The Public Defender is responsible for furnishing legal counsel to any person who, for lack of sufficient funds, is unable to obtain legal counsel in any situation where representation is constitutionally guaranteed. Eligibility for public defender services is based on federal poverty guidelines. Income, family financial responsibilities and the nature of the charges are all considered in determining qualification for legal representation by the public defender.

HonestyDefendants often believe it is better not to tell their lawyers the truth about their case. This is not a good idea. Everything you tell your lawyer is privileged and cannot be told to others. The best defense is one that prepares for all the bad evidence the prosecutor may present against you at your trial. Your lawyer must know all the facts. It is foolish to ignore the dangers and simply hope everything will turn out all right. That is the sure way to be convicted.

Bad AdviceIf you are in custody, you will probably get a lot of free advice from other inmates. Unfortunately, much of that advice will be wrong. Many other inmates are in state custody and know nothing about federal criminal law. Even the ones facing federal charges may give you bad advice either because they do not know any better or because they want to mislead you.

RememberWrite down everything you remember about your case. Take the time to remember everything you can about the charges against you. Where were you? Who was with you? What were you doing? Sometimes even the smallest bit of information can be helpful in developing your defense. If you have the names of any witnesses, try to get their addresses and telephone numbers.

RespectTreat your lawyer with respect, and that respect will be returned to you. Lawyers are human beings who tend to work harder for clients who do not mistreat them. Whenever you appear in court, show respect for the judge. The way you behave in court can have a significant impact on the outcome of your case. It can affect the amount and type of your bail which is set at your preliminary arraignment. The impression you make on the judge can influence whether the judge believes you and your witnesses. Always be calm and polite.

Listen to your lawyerAt your preliminary hearing, listen to your attorney. In most cases, your attorney will not have you testify at your preliminary hearing. The purpose of this hearing is to find out what evidence the police have against you. If you testify, the prosecutor will be allowed to ask you questions. This could confuse you or hurt your case later. You should listen carefully and follow the instructions of your attorney.

RearrestsIf you are arrested on other charges, notify your defense attorney immediately. Your attorney will not automatically receive any notice of new charges filed against you. If you are contacted by the police, rearrested or receive a summons in the mail concerning new charges, you should contact your defense attorney immediately. If you do not do this, there may not be an attorney present to represent you at the time of your hearing.

Stay in touchIf you are released from jail, move or change your telephone number, contact the public defender. It is very important for your defense attorney to be able to contact you. Whenever there is a change in your status, you should contact the office and let us know where you are. This is very important when we are preparing your defense and may affect the outcome of your case.RETURN TO topics

Preliminary Arraignment/BailThe initial stage is the Preliminary Arraignment. This is a proceeding before a Magistrate District Judge where your bail is set. If you have received a summons, rather than having been arrested, the bail may be set before the Preliminary Hearing.RETURN TO topics

Preliminary Hearing This will take place 3-10 days after arrest, unless the case proceeds by summons, where the time period is longer. At the Preliminary Hearing, the Commonwealth must present a prima facie case. This is “bare bones” and they will argue to the Magistrate that they presented the basic elements of the crimes. The Defense rarely presents any witnesses. If your case is held for court, your next appearance is the Formal Arraignment. This will be approximately 6-8 weeks later. At a preliminary hearing the prosecutor must show that there is sufficient evidence to bring charges against you and take you to trial. In most cases you will not testify at your preliminary hearing. Because the magistrate at your hearing does not have the authority to resolve all legal issues in your case, you will not present a defense at this stage. It is your opportunity to learn what evidence the prosecution has against you. After this, you will need time to organize and prove any defense you may have.RETURN TO topics

Formal ArraignmentThis stage is approximately 6-8 weeks after the preliminary hearing and is the first formal presentation of the charges against you. You will be assigned a Judge, and a date for the next stage, the Pre-Trial Conference. This will be approximately 2-4 weeks after your Formal Arraignment. RETURN TO topics

Pre-Trial Conference On the scheduled date, you will report to the courtroom assigned for your Pre-Trial Conference. You will receive a trial date which will depend on the Assistant District Attorney, your counsel and the Judge’s calendar. If your charges are held for court, you will be given a date to appear for formal arraignment. At that time you will learn the final charges filed against you by the district attorney and be able to review the evidence they have against you. After that, you will be scheduled for a pre-trial conference. . At that time you will advise the court on how you wish to proceed and you will have a trial date scheduled.RETURN TO topics

Trial This date will begin your criminal trial. Your case will proceed as a jury, non-jury or plea. Additional information will be explained in depth by your trial counsel.RETURN TO topics

Sentencing Appeals must be filed within 30 days of your sentencing date or the date of the court’s rulings on Post Sentence Proceedings. The Appellate Courts will only consider issues that allege errors of law, not fact. Your counsel will file a brief, setting out your case for the Court.RETURN TO topics

Appeals/Post-Conviction Relief Appeals must be filed within 30 days of your sentencing date or the date of the court’s rulings on Post Sentence Proceedings. The Appellate Courts will only consider issues that allege errors of law, not fact. Your counsel will file a brief, setting out your case for the Court.
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Conclusion Remember, every case is different. The above information is only very general advice. There may be special rules that apply to your particular situation. You need to talk about the specific issues in your case with your lawyer.

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